Lesson 9: October 27, 2019

Luke 6:37–48 People often respond to forgiveness with loving acts. What can we do to show gratitude to those who forgive us? In Luke, the sinful woman showed her gratitude to Jesus by washing his feet with her tears and anointing him with expensive oil.

Faith Saves

Bible Background • LUKE 7:36–50
Printed Text • LUKE 7:37–48 | Devotional Reading • JOHN 13:3–11

Words You Should Know

A. Ointment (v. 37) muron (Gk.)—An expensive, aromatic perfume

B. Alabaster (v. 37) alabastros (Gk.)—An expensive stone, originally from Egypt, used to store costly perfumes

Teacher Preparation

Unifying Principle—Extravagant love. People often respond to forgiveness with loving acts. What can we do to show gratitude to those who forgive us? In Luke, the sinful woman showed her gratitude to Jesus by washing his feet with her tears and anointing him with expensive oil.

A. Read the Bible Background and Devotional Reading.

B. Pray for your students and lesson clarity.

C. Read the lesson Scripture in multiple translations.

O—Open the Lesson

A. Begin the class with prayer.

B. Have the class identify and briefly discuss two barriers that keep people from forgiving others.

C. Have the students read the Aim for Change and the In Focus story.

D. Ask students how events like those in the story weigh on their hearts and how they can view these events from a faith perspective.

P—Present the Scriptures

A. Read the Focal Verses.

B. Have the class share what Scriptures stand out for them and why, with particular emphasis on today’s context.

C. Discuss the Background and The People, Places, and Times sections.

E—Explore the Meaning

A. Use In Depth or More Light on the Text to facilitate a deeper discussion of the lesson text.

B. Pose the questions in Search the Scriptures and Discuss the Meaning.

C. Discuss the Liberating Lesson and Application for Activation sections.

N—Next Steps for Application

A. Summarize the value of showing gratitude for those who forgive.

B. End class with a commitment to pray for the capacity to forgive others and show gratefulness with kind acts.

Worship Guide
For the Superintendent or Teacher
Theme: Faith Saves
Song: “Your Love is Extravagant”
Devotional Reading: John 13:3–11

Aim for Change

By the end of the lesson, we will: EXAMINE how the sinful woman demonstrated her love and gratitude to Jesus, REFLECT on how the woman’s love and devotion led her to cross social barriers to anoint Jesus, and BECOME emboldened to resist social pressures that would prevent expressions of love and gratitude for our salvation.

In Focus

Gary steadied himself as he stood to walk to the podium above the casket where his sister peacefully lay. He told himself that he could deliver the speech he had rehearsed a million times in his head without breaking down. “Y’all know if Gabby were up here, she’d throw up two fingers and yell, ‘Hollaaaah!’” When everyone laughed, Gary relaxed. “Gabby was known for being the life of the party, even though sometimes she tried to be the life of the wrong kind of party. She had us worried before she knew Jesus.”

He cleared his throat again and said, “You know, Gabby died way too young. It’s hard for me to believe that just a few hours after our family had Sunday dinner together, she was killed in a car accident. Our family is heartbroken.

“One of the things bringing us comfort right now is knowing that Gabby belongs to God,” Gary said. “She accepted Him as her Savior. She became a new person, with a new life. She lived her last years thankful every day to the Lord for saving her from the destructive life she saw in some of her friends. Gabby always lived as a joyful hope for them to find the better way she had found. And we know that she’s experiencing new life now in heaven with the Lord.” After Gary spoke, the people rose from their seats, clapping in celebration for Gabby’s life and the new life she had gained in Christ.

Identify ways Gabby affected people’s lives. What was the main point of Gary’s message about his sister Gabby? Share how others may testify to the goodness of Christ in your life.

Keep in Mind

“And stood at his feet behind him weeping, and began to wash his feet with tears, and did wipe them with the hairs of her head, and kissed his feet, and anointed them with the ointment” (Luke 7:38, KJV).

“Then she knelt behind him at his feet, weeping. Her tears fell on his feet, and she wiped them off with her hair. Then she kept kissing his feet and putting perfume on them” (Luke 7:38, NLT).

KJV Luke 7:37 And, behold, a woman in the city, which was a sinner, when she knew that Jesus sat at meat in the Pharisee’s house, brought an alabaster box of ointment,

38 And stood at his feet behind him weeping, and began to wash his feet with tears, and did wipe them with the hairs of her head, and kissed his feet, and anointed them with the ointment.

39 Now when the Pharisee which had bidden him saw it, he spake within himself, saying, This man, if he were a prophet, would have known who and what manner of woman this is that toucheth him: for she is a sinner.

40 And Jesus answering said unto him, Simon, I have somewhat to say unto thee. And he saith, Master, say on.

41 There was a certain creditor which had two debtors: the one owed five hundred pence, and the other fifty.

42 And when they had nothing to pay, he frankly forgave them both. Tell me therefore, which of them will love him most?

43 Simon answered and said, I suppose that he, to whom he forgave most. And he said unto him, Thou hast rightly judged.

44 And he turned to the woman, and said unto Simon, Seest thou this woman? I entered into thine house, thou gavest me no water for my feet: but she hath washed my feet with tears, and wiped them with the hairs of her head.

45 Thou gavest me no kiss: but this woman since the time I came in hath not ceased to kiss my feet.

46 My head with oil thou didst not anoint: but this woman hath anointed my feet with ointment.

47 Wherefore I say unto thee, Her sins, which are many, are forgiven; for she loved much: but to whom little is forgiven, the same loveth little.

48 And he said unto her, Thy sins are forgiven.

NLT Luke 7:37 When a certain immoral woman from that city heard he was eating there, she brought a beautiful alabaster jar filled with expensive perfume.

38 Then she knelt behind him at his feet, weeping. Her tears fell on his feet, and she wiped them off with her hair. Then she kept kissing his feet and putting perfume on them.

39 When the Pharisee who had invited him saw this, he said to himself, “If this man were a prophet, he would know what kind of woman is touching him. She’s a sinner!”

40 Then Jesus answered his thoughts. “Simon,” he said to the Pharisee, “I have something to say to you.” “Go ahead, Teacher,” Simon replied.

41 Then Jesus told him this story: “A man loaned money to two people—500 pieces of silver to one and 50 pieces to the other.

42 But neither of them could repay him, so he kindly forgave them both, canceling their debts. Who do you suppose loved him more after that?”

43 Simon answered, “I suppose the one for whom he canceled the larger debt.” “That’s right,” Jesus said.

44 Then he turned to the woman and said to Simon, “Look at this woman kneeling here. When I entered your home, you didn’t offer me water to wash the dust from my feet, but she has washed them with her tears and wiped them with her hair.

45 You didn’t greet me with a kiss, but from the time I first came in, she has not stopped kissing my feet.

46 You neglected the courtesy of olive oil to anoint my head, but she has anointed my feet with rare perfume.

47 I tell you, her sins—and they are many— have been forgiven, so she has shown me much love. But a person who is forgiven little shows only little love.”

48 Then Jesus said to the woman, “Your sins are forgiven.”

The People, Places, and Times

Alabaster. The term “alabaster box” actually refers to a flask or jar made of special white or yellow translucent limestone named after Alabaster, the town in Egypt where it is chiefly found. The material was often used to carve vases in which to store perfume. The vases are usually made without handles and can be easily broken to remove their contents.

Pharisee. A religious party or school among the Jews at the time of Christ, called “the separated ones.” They were founded in the second century BC, as a protest against the Hellenistic influence that was threatening to undermine the sacred religion of their fathers. They were known for their zealous obedience to God’s law. They also became major opponents of Jesus. They believed in a twofold law: the written and the oral Torah, or tradition. This tradition is what usually brought them into arguments with Jesus.

Background

The Gospel writer Luke inserts an editorial comment in his account of Jesus’ ministry: “But the Pharisees and lawyers rejected the counsel of God against themselves, being not baptized of him” (Luke 7:30). Jesus was a controversial figure who attracted crowds and generated much interest. Some people in the crowd were excited about His presence and received Him as a prophet; some looked for Him to be the king who would free them from Roman occupation; some were onlookers who followed the reports of miracles, signs, and wonders. All of this chatter was disturbing to those who were Jewish leaders: the Pharisees, Sadducees, and scribes (or lawyers). Jesus disrupted the balance of communal power by declaring God accessible to all no matter their social status. Jesus was known for calling out the religious leaders for contradictions in their public appearance and treatment of people while, in contrast, showing compassion and acceptance to those who were marginalized. He would be classified as one who would associate with tax collectors and sinners, which made encounters with the Pharisees strained (Luke 7:34).

At-A-Glance

1. Faith That Shows Hospitality
(Luke 7:37-38)
2. Faith That Receives Forgiveness
(vv. 39–43)
3. Faith That Results in Salvation
(vv. 44–48)

In Depth

1. Faith That Shows Hospitality (Luke 7:37-38)

Jesus was invited to dinner at the home of a Pharisee named Simon. Pharisees often used meal invitations to question and challenge Jesus and to trap Him publicly. Although held at a home, the gathering was more like a public banquet where others were able to look on as guests were feasting. This unnamed woman approached Jesus while He was reclining at the table. She had with her an alabaster box containing expensive, fragrant oil. She stood behind Him and washed Jesus’ feet with her tears, wiped His feet with her hair, and kissed His feet. Like the woman caught in the act of adultery (John 8:2–11) or the woman at the well (John 4:7–30), this woman had what was considered an unsavory reputation. The woman mentioned in Luke is not believed to be the same person as Mary Magdalene or Mary of Bethany. As the woman was engaged in this loving act of worship, Simon smugly commented to himself that if Jesus were really a prophet He would know what kind of woman was touching Him. Simon looked down on her as a sinful woman. From his perception, this woman’s display was another example of Jesus’ connection with those deemed less than respectable. It was cause enough for him to internally dismiss Jesus’ ministry.

Why are people so quick to dismiss and judge people who are different?

2. Faith That Receives Forgiveness (vv. 39–43)

Jesus in His wisdom and omniscience addresses Simon with a parable. He uses this illustration to prove why this unnamed woman’s act of love was acceptable to Him. In the story, two people owed a debt that they could not repay. The lender forgave both debtors, but one of the borrowers had a substantially greater amount of debt he could not repay. Jesus then asked Simon a pointed question: Which one of these debtors would love the lender more and prove to be more grateful? Simon supposed that the one with the larger sum would love the most, which was the correct answer.

What should be our response to the full payment of our sin debt?

3. Faith That Results in Salvation (vv. 44–48)

Jesus expands His message by replying to Simon about his ungracious behavior and commending the woman for her hospitality. It was a custom in Jesus’ time for the host to warmly greet guests upon arrival. If they were people of means, the host would have a servant wash their feet of the filth from the dusty roads. Jesus in His response also reveals that He knew Simon’s thoughts about Him and the woman. He lets it be known that He is aware of what she is doing and why. We don’t know what her sins are. We don’t know how she came to know that Jesus could forgive her sins, but she takes a risk as a woman and a known sinner to approach Jesus in this manner. Although her sins are many, she is forgiven, and He received her love. This unnamed woman in humility worships Jesus and is able to express her gratitude and receive redemption for her soul as well as her reputation.

How we can show hospitality that leads others to Christ?

 

Search the Scriptures

1. Who was the uninvited guest who approached Jesus during dinner? (Luke 7:37)

2. What did this uninvited guest do for Jesus at the dinner table? (v. 38)

3. How did Jesus respond to the uninvited guest? (v. 48)

 

Discuss the Meaning

This unnamed woman gave life to the point of Jesus’ illustration to Simon not only for her situation but also for all who receive the gift of salvation. One who recognizes the priceless gift of salvation loves much (Luke 7:47). How can we demonstrate our gratitude to Jesus for salvation? How should Christians carry out Jesus’ ministry of love and acceptance across the lines that separate us?

Liberating Lesson

We live in a world obsessed with celebrity and fame. People are quick to lift to icon status those who possess extraordinary talent, power, or money. At the same time, there is too often no regard for those who are considered everyday working people. There is dignity in all work, and no matter the labels, all people have extraordinary value. In Christ we all have received forgiveness of sins and are made equal before Him. Therefore, His church should be reflective of people who love much because they have been forgiven much. The church should be a community of equity where God’s people carry the spirit of reconciliation to influence the world. They will know we are Christians by our love (cf. John 13:35).

 

Application for Activation

What a radical idea: The church should lead the way in showing love, forgiveness, and the ministry of reconciliation! How can we be used by God this week to reflect His love to others and lead them into relationship with Him (cf. Romans 2:4)? Jesus receives us; how can we be intentional about receiving others?

 

Follow the Spirit

What God wants me to do

Remember Your Thoughts

Special insights I have learned:

More Light on the Text

Luke 7:37–48

This passage illustrates the different reactions Jesus and the Pharisees have toward sinners. In a complex, yet vivid account, Luke narrates the anointing of Jesus’ feet by a sinful woman. In the face of differing reactions, Jesus offers comfort to the woman and also manages to rebuke the Pharisees who complain of his openness to her. The passage illustrates the previous comment that Jesus openly associates with sinners (7:34). Jesus’ parable clearly explains why He does so (7:41–43). In addition, Jesus declares the woman’s sin forgiven. Thus, the passage has two points of confrontation: association with sinners and the right to forgive sin. The passage is a picture of forgiveness and faith that is offered to everyone. It shows that God’s call is nondiscriminatory, transcending both social and gender barriers.

37 And, behold, a woman in the city, which was a sinner, when she knew that Jesus sat at meat in the Pharisee’s house, brought an alabaster box of ointment,

A woman in the city described as a sinner comes to know of the presence of Jesus at a meal in a Pharisee’s house. There have been attempts to identify this woman. Early scholars identify this nameless woman as Mary Magdalene, but there is no biblical evidence for this identification. Furthermore, “a sinner” simply states her character. It is too severe to make the usual judgment of the woman as a prostitute or harlot who is known the town over as such. Charity demands that we do not think worse of a person than indicated by the available evidence. As such, “a sinner” may not necessarily imply more than that this woman had at some time done wrong and that her fall became publicly known and damaged her reputation ever after. Simply stated, we do not know the nature of her sinfulness. As the phrase “in the city” suggests, her sinfulness is sufficiently public to be known to the people at large. It does not warrant her label as a common prostitute.

A meal, such as the one that Jesus attended, was not private. People could come in and watch what went on. At the same time, a woman of questionable character would not have been very welcome in Simon’s house, so it took courage for her to come. The woman brings an alabaster flask of ointment. The word alabastros (Gk.) describes an expensive container for costly perfumes.

The significance of Christ’s acceptance of an invitation to a dinner in a Pharisee’s house must not be lost. He has dined with Pharisees at other times, too (Luke 11:37, 14:1). However, here he is depicted as treating them in the same way he would treat tax collectors and sinners (7:34). He was neither contemptuous of the religious and wealthy nor prone to give them undue respect. He accepted invitations across the board. He was neither aloof nor class-discriminatory. Ultimately, Jesus was more concerned with the quality of relationships than arbitrary classifications due to the accident of birth, social history, or status.

38 And stood at his feet behind him weeping, and began to wash his feet with tears, and did wipe them with the hairs of her head, and kissed his feet, and anointed them with the ointment.

The narrative has to be understood against the backdrop of dinner settings. People reclined on low couches at meals, leaning on the left arm with the head toward the table and the body stretched away from it. The sandals were removed before reclining. The woman was thus able to approach Jesus’ feet without difficulty. She may have intended to anoint them (or the head), but her emotions got the better of her, and her tears fell on his feet.

She promptly wiped them with her hair, a significant action, for Jewish ladies did not unbind their hair in public. In fact, Jewish women would have their heads covered at all times outside their own houses. Any woman with her hair exposed to public view would be considered promiscuous. This is likely where historical commentators have surmised the woman was a prostitute, but again, this is not necessarily so. While this woman’s ethnicity is never revealed, it is worth noting that Greek and Roman women had fewer restrictions concerning women covering their hair. While Roman women were more likely than Greek women to cover their heads in public, it was socially acceptable for a respectable woman to leave her house without covering her hair at all. Even with that allowance, however, any physical contact between a man and woman in public would have been shocking. Whether this woman had her hair loose in public because she was a Jew used to sexual licentiousness or because she was a Gentile, she would not have usually been welcomed into such an intimate setting with a respectable Jewish man. That this woman wiping Jesus’ feet with her hair would thus indicate not only her humility but also her marginal social status.

Clearly the woman was oblivious to public opinion in the grip of her deep emotion. This will explain also her kissing of the feet. Finally, she anointed Jesus’ feet with the perfume. Normally this would have been poured on the head. To use it on the feet is probably a mark of humility. To attend to the feet was a menial task, one assigned to a slave. The passage does not state why she was weeping. It may have been because she was seeking forgiveness. Or she may have been weeping for joy at the opportunity to be near the One she obviously considered to be the Messiah.

39 Now when the Pharisee which had bidden him saw it, he spake within himself, saying, This man, if he were a prophet, would have known who and what manner of woman this is that toucheth him: for she is a sinner.

The whole scene must have appeared shameful to Simon the Pharisee. Jesus’ failure to rebuke this sinful woman is proof to Simon that Jesus has no idea of what kind of woman she is. The irony here is that while Simon is inwardly musing about the limitation of Jesus’ prophetic insight regarding the true character of the woman, Jesus is reading Simon’s thoughts. Simon’s thoughts reveal a common belief: A prophet ought to be able to perceive the character of persons with whom he associates. Jesus shows that He not only has perfect insight into the character of the woman but knows Simon’s as well. In the preceding section, Jesus portrays Himself as one who “ate and drank” and who is a friend of sinners (v. 34). This passage is a perfect illustration for Jesus’ description of Himself. Here we find Jesus dining with sinners.

40 And Jesus answering said unto him, Simon, I have somewhat to say unto thee. And he saith, Master, say on. 41 There was a certain creditor which had two debtors: the one owed five hundred pence, and the other fifty. 42 And when they had nothing to pay, he frankly forgave them both. Tell me therefore, which of them will love him most? 43 Simon answered and said, I suppose that he, to whom he forgave most. And he said unto him, Thou hast rightly judged.

Here Jesus gives His parable of the two debtors. Jesus seeks to disarm Simon’s prejudice by drawing him into the parable. This parable, both in its substance and application, reveals an excellent example of the overwhelming force and persuasiveness in Christ’s arguments. The parable is straightforward and intelligible, serving the purpose of clarifying a real-life situation. Jesus succeeds in maintaining the conversation and affecting conviction, where direct speech would have failed this objective. The link between the analogy and life is provided by the concept of “forgiveness” applied respectively to debt and sin (v. 42). Jesus is not merely trying to convince Simon that He knows and understands him; He wants to help Simon understand himself. The story, as a parable, opens a new reality to Simon, but the tragic fact is that this reality has already been revealed to him in the relationship between Jesus and the sinful woman, and he remains blind to it. The Pharisee admits that the greatest debtor would feel the greatest gratitude (v. 43).

The implicit Christological teachings in this incident should be noted: (1) Jesus knows Simon’s thoughts; (2) He knows that the woman is a sinner as the parable shows and thus refutes Simon’s second presupposition; (3) Jesus is able to forgive sins—something God alone can do [7:49]; and (4) Simon’s and the woman’s standing before God is revealed and determined by their attitude toward Jesus. Jesus’ subsequent explanation of the miracle shows that each part of the parable has a parallel: The creditor represents God; the debt is sin. From His parable, we can conclude that the debtor who owes less depicts the Pharisee, while the one who owes more represents the woman.

The important feature in the account is the forgiveness of the debt. God is ready and willing to forgive the debts of people and to act graciously beyond expectation. This picture of God’s grace motivates Jesus’ acceptance of those in dire need, regardless of who they are, and His openness toward sinners. It is this very point that Simon needs to realize, as the following verses make clear. The sinner who realizes the nature of the forgiveness received freely will be in a position to love God greatly. Jesus is not concerned with what the sin is, but who the sinner could be through God’s love. Jesus’ awareness of how God can transform people makes Him look forward to what God can make of them rather than dwell on their past (cf. Hebrews 12:2).

44 And he turned to the woman, and said unto Simon, Seest thou this woman? I entered into thine house, thou gavest me no water for my feet: but she hath washed my feet with tears, and wiped them with the hairs of her head. 45 Thou gavest me no kiss: but this woman since the time I came in hath not ceased to kiss my feet. 46 My head with oil thou didst not anoint: but this woman hath anointed my feet with ointment.

Simon has neglected all of the customary courtesies accorded to guests and fails to act as a hospitable host. The phrase “thou gavest me no” is repeated for each of the ways Simon fails in hospitality: water for cleansing (v. 44), a kiss of greeting (v. 45), and oil for anointing (v. 46). The heat and dust of Palestine and the fact that sandals were merely soles bound to the feet with leather tongs made the washing of feet on entering the home both a courtesy and a necessity. Simon fails in this. In contrast to Simon, it is the “sinner” woman, an unwelcome guest for that matter, who provides the hospitality that Simon should have provided. By the logic of the parable, the woman’s actions show her state of forgiveness. Simon has proven by his own treatment of his Guest that he is thoughtless and almost, if not quite, loveless.

The woman makes up for Simon’s thoughtlessness by washing Jesus’ feet with her tears. Furthermore, Simon does not kiss the master, but the woman, with purity and true humility, has more than made up for the lack by repeatedly kissing the feet of Jesus. Finally, Simon does not supply simple “oil” (Gk. elaion, EH-lye-own) to anoint Jesus’ head, as was the customary hygiene of the day. A different word for anoint would have been used for religious connotations. Jesus is not blaming Simon for not recognizing Him as the anointed Messiah, only for not helping Him wash up for dinner. Simon’s lack of common hospitality is highlighted more by the woman as she anoints the dirtiest part of Jesus’ body with expensive, aromatic perfume (Gk. muron, MOO-ron, “ointment”).

47 Wherefore I say unto thee, Her sins, which are many, are forgiven; for she loved much: but to whom little is forgiven, the same loveth little.

Jesus’ pronouncement concludes the parable. Curiously, Jesus repeats His declaration of the woman’s forgiveness, first by addressing Simon, then the woman. Simon sees a “woman sinner,” but Jesus sees a “forgiven woman.” In order to properly convey the point that Jesus wants to make from the parable, He has to argue in reverse from the “love” shown by the woman to demonstrate that she has been forgiven. Jesus’ remarks make clear that He knows who the woman is. Simon had doubted that Jesus was a prophet because he believed He had not discerned this about the woman (7:39). The reference to her many sins shows that Jesus knows all along who the woman is. Simon should by now recognize that a prophet is present.

At first sight, the verse would seem to suggest that the woman’s love for Jesus is the basis of her forgiveness. This is not the case. The wording of Jesus’ parable strongly implies the woman’s demonstration of love is an expression of being forgiven: The one who is forgiven much loves much. Love is the consequence of forgiveness. It is important to note that there is no simple calculus of forgiveness and gratitude in the ministry of Jesus. The passage does not tell us how the woman comes to the state of forgiveness, which is the basis of manifestation of her acts of love toward Jesus. Gratitude definitely follows the acceptance of God’s undeserved mercy and forgiveness. To the Pharisee, this woman is still a sinner. Jesus does not in any way deny that her sins are “many,” but that she is no longer under the burden of them. As the next verse shows, she is now forgiven. This is the message of salvation in a nutshell.

48 And he said unto her, Thy sins are forgiven.

These words to the woman are among the most precious words Jesus spoke to her or to the many who are redeemed: “Thy sins are forgiven.”

Sources:
Bock, Darrell L. Luke: 1:1–9:50, vol. 1, Baker Exegetical Commentary
on the New Testament. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic,
1994.
Bovon, Francois and Helmut Koester, Luke 1: A Commentary on the
Gospel of Luke 1:1–9:50, Hermeneia—a Critical and Historical
Commentary on the Bible. Minneapolis, MN: Fortress Press, 2002.
Carroll, John T. Luke: A Commentary. New Testament Library.
Louisville, KY: Wesminster John Knox Press, 2012.
John A. Martin, “Luke,” in The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An
Exposition of the Scriptures, eds. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck,
vol. 2. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985.
Johnson, Luke Timothy The Gospel of Luke. Sacra Pagina vol. 3.
Collegeville, MN: The Liturgical Press, 1991.
Keener, Craig S. The IVP Bible Background Commentary: New Testament.
Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1993.
Lenski, R. C. H. The Interpretation of St. Luke’s Gospel. Minneapolis, MN:
Augsburg Publishing House, 1961.
Morris, Leon. Luke: An Introduction and Commentary, vol. 3, Tyndale
New Testament Commentaries. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity
Press, 1988.
Noland, John. Luke 1:1–9:20, vol. 35A, Word Biblical Commentary.
Dallas, TX: Word, Incorporated, 2002.
Stein, Robert H. Luke, vol. 24, The New American Commentary.
Nashville, TN: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1992.

Say It Correctly

Alabaster. AL-uh-BAS-ter.
Pharisee. FEHR-ih-see.

Daily Bible Readings

MONDAY
God’s Salvation for All People
(Isaiah 52:7–10)

TUESDAY
Your Sins Are Forgiven
(Luke 5:20–26)

WEDNESDAY
Salvation Requires Enduring Witness
(Mark 13:9–13)

THURSDAY
All Who Call Will Be Saved
(Romans 10:5–13)

FRIDAY
Treat Each Other Like Jesus Does
(John 13:12–20)

SATURDAY
Leaders Reject God’s Messenger
(Luke 7:24–30)

SUNDAY
Her Many Sins Have Been Forgiven
(Luke 7:37–48)